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Week 10 Lesson Plans

May 25 - June 2, 2020


This Week's Lesson Plans

Download Week 10 - May 25, 2020

Tuesday, May 26 - Tuesday, June 2 - Economics Activity

Economics Activity

"Dear Teacher" Letter Writing Project

Completion Date: Tuesday, 6/2
Downloadable Project Sheet

This is meant to be our final writing project! You should not begin the writing portion of this project until you have completed the full Letter Writing Flocabulary Assignment and the IXL practices for formatting letter headings and greetings. You may choose to share your letter next Tuesday the 2nd, if you like. You may also share it privately.

Project Overview:
You will write a final end-of-the-year letter to your teacher. In your letter, it is very important that you format it correctly and have a full paragraph for the body. You need a good topic sentence to begin the body, three strong sentences that relate to your topic sentence, and a good conclusion to wrap your letter up. Be sure to include the ideas and formatting that you learn from the Flocabulary assignment this week.

Process
:

1. 
Complete the Letter Writing Flocabulary Assignment.

2. 
Complete the IXL topics for formatting letter headings and greetings.

3. 
Write your letter.

Prewriting: Brainstorm and organize the items you want to discuss in the letter with a bubble map or chart. - The center bubble will be your topic sentence. All of the bubbles that flow from it will be your supporting details for your letter. Remember to stay on topic and make sure they flow in a good order. Think hard about what you want to tell your teacher.

First Draft: Begin your letter. Be sure it has all of the appropriate parts of a letter:

Heading – The address & date – You can use the school’s address here (
2620 Carolina Avenue, Roanoke, VA 24014).
Greeting
Body
Closing
Signature

Revise and Edit: Be sure your sentences all relate to one another. Make sure you have ordered and formatted your letter like the Flocabulary lesson shows. Also, make sure you correct any spelling, capitalization, and punctuation.

Final Draft: Neatly write your final copy. Don't forget to use your paper correctly. Remember to space your letters evenly in words and your words evenly in sentences.

4. 
Be ready to share, if you would like, on Tuesday 6/2 during our ZOOM meeting. You may also email your letter directly.

This project is meant to be an important closing project to your year in third grade, so completing it is highly encouraged. You do not have to share aloud with others. It can be privately shared with your teacher.




Week 9 Lesson Plans

May 18 - 22, 2020


This Week's Lesson Plans

Download Week 9 - May 18, 2020

Thursday, May 14 - Wednesday, May 20 - Social Studies Activity

Ancient Mali Activity

"School is Best at ..." Opinion Writing Project

Completion Date: Tuesday, 5/26
Downloadable Project Sheet

This is meant to be an expressive project that relates to our current schooling situation! You should not begin the writing portion of this project until you have completed the full Opinion Writing Flocabulary Assignment and the IXL practices for Opinion. We will share these Opinions next Tuesday the 26th.

Project Overview:
You will write an opinion paragraph about the type of school that YOU THINK is best. Your paragraph with be titled “School is Best at School” or “School is Best at Home”. In opinion writing, it is very important that you provide great reasons for why you have that opinion. So, you need to focus on three good reasons why you feel the way you do. Be sure to include the ideas and processes that you learn from the Flocabulary assignment this week.

Process:
1. Complete the Opinion Writing Flocabulary Assignment.

2. C
omplete the IXL topics for Opinion.

3. 
Choose your opinion and create a strong topic sentence that states your opinion.

4. 
Write your paragraph.

Prewriting: Brainstorm and organize your reasons with a bubble map or chart. The center bubble will be your opinion (topic sentence). All of the bubbles that flow from it will be your reasons for your opinion. Remember to make these strong. Just because you like it, doesn’t make it a strong supporting reason. Think hard about very convincing reasons that you have your opinion.

First Draft: Let your opinion flow and start writing your paragraph based on your prewriting.
Like all good paragraphs, please be sure you include the following:
Topic Sentence: State your opinion.
Supporting Details: Include at least three strong reasons that support your opinion.
Conclusion Sentence: Restate your opinion and wrap it up.

Revise and Edit: Be sure you have included as great reasons for having your opinion. Make sure the reader can clearly understand your opinion. You want them to know why you feel the way you do about your opinion. Also, make sure you correct any spelling, capitalization, and punctuation.

Final Draft: Neatly write your final copy. Don't forget to use your paper correctly and indent the first line of each paragraph. Remember to space your letters evenly in words and your words evenly in sentences.

5. 
Be ready to share on Tuesday 5/26 during our ZOOM meeting.



Week 8 Lesson Plans

May 11 - 15, 2020


This Week's Lesson Plans

Download Week 8 - May 11, 2020

Tuesday, May 12 and Wednesday, May 13 - Science Activity

Ecosystem Changes: Human and Natural Impacts

Thursday, May 14 - Wednesday, May 20 - Social Studies Activity

Ancient Mali Activity

Can You Guess My Career? Writing Project

Completion Date: Thursday, 5/14
Downloadable Project Sheet

This is meant to be a fun project writing project! It is suggested that you spend about 15-20 minutes each today that will begin today through this coming Thursday.

 Project Overview
Write a paragraph about a career you would like to have when you are grown, but DON'T tell us the actual career or job.  Your goal is to include enough details in your writing that we will be able to guess what career or job you are writing about.

You may need to do a little research about your career, so you can tell us details about it. Some details may include the number of years you’ll need to go to school after high school, the special skills you need to do the job, and the kinds of duties you would do during a typical day on the job. Below are some links to help you with your research.  You will read your paragraphs to us during Thursday’s Zoom meeting to see if we can guess your career choice.  When you are done writing, you can draw a picture of yourself doing the career you have chosen or find things around the house that represent your choice (kind of like the Brown Bag activity we shared at the beginning of the year). You will share these as a “reveal” after you read and we try to guess.

I know some of you may have goals of becoming a professional athlete, and that’s great, but I would like you to think about and look into other career options to share for this particular project. 

Process:

1. Research your career or job choice, if needed:

https://www.vaview.vt.edu/k5/check-it/kids-search/
This site allows you to choose your interests and it will generate career options with descriptions from which you can choose.

 
https://www.vacareerview.org/k5/whats-that/unusual-occ
 
This site describes some unusual occupations you may not know about.

2. Write your Paragraph.
Prewriting: Organize your career details in a bubble map or chart.
The center bubble should be your career itself and the bubbles that come flow from it should be all of the different descriptive details about the career or job.

First Draft: Let your paragraph flow and start writing it according to your prewriting.
Like all good paragraphs, please be sure you include the following:
Topic Sentence: State your main idea, what you are writing about, but don't name your career in your actual paragraph.
Supporting Details: Include the following: How many years of education will your career choice require?  If you like, you may include a college that you would like to attend.  Graduate school may be necessary to reach your goal, so include that too. What special skills do you need for your career choice?What kinds of duties might you perform in a typical day on the job?
Concluding sentence: Be sure you have a strong ending sentence that restates your main idea or topic sentence.

Revise and Edit: Be sure you have included as many details about the career that you can. You want to provide your class with enough clues to be able to make an educated guess about which career you have chosen. Also, make sure you correct any spelling, capitalization, and punctuation.

Final Draft: Neatly write your final copy. Don't forget to use your paper correctly and indent the first line of each paragraph. Remember to space your letters evenly in words and your words evenly in sentences.

3. Have fun drawing or brown-bagging your career!

4. 
Be ready to share on Thursday 5/14 during our ZOOM meeting.

Remember, this is meant to be an extra and fun project. Do not stress about it, and if your family can’t make it work, that is okay. I look forward to hearing and guessing with those that have time for the project this Thursday 5/14!





Week 7 Lesson Plans

May 4 - May 8, 2020


This Week's Lesson Plans

Download Week 7 - May 4, 2020

Friday, May 8 and Monday, May 11 - Science Activity

Aquatic Biomes of the World Activity

We will begin Human and Natural Impacts on Tuesday...Coming Soon!

Can You Guess the Animal? Writing Project
Descriptive Writing Project

Completion Date: Thursday, 5/7
Downloadable Project Sheet

 This is meant to be a fun project that combines our science study and writing! It is suggested that you spend about 15-20 minutes each today that will begin today through this coming Thursday.

 Project Overview:
You will write a descriptive paragraph about an animal, but DON'T tell us what the animal is.  Don't name it! Your goal is to include enough descriptive language in your writing that we will be able to guess what animal you are writing about. You need to focus on your "creature's features" so you can add descriptive, and scientific, details to help us visualize your animal while you read. When you are done writing, draw a picture of your animal in its habitat. If you prefer, build your animal out of Lego or other odds and ends you find around your house. You can also just share a stuffed animal version of your animal. For those of you that choose to complete the project, we will share our descriptive paragraphs and play "Can You Guess the Animal?"  in our Zoom Class Meeting on Thursday 5/7.

 Process:

1. Choose an animal that you wish to describe in detail.

You may want to use some science websites to do some detail research about your animal. Here are a few suggestions:

National Geographic Kids
https://kids.nationalgeographic.com/animals/

San Diego Zoo
https://zoo.sandiegozoo.org/animals-plants

2. Write your Story.


Prewriting:

Brainstorm and organize your story ideas for your character with a bubble map or chart.
 o   The center bubble should be your animal itself and the bubbles that come flow from it should be all of the different descriptive characteristics of your animal. Remember to include details about your animal’s physical looks, behaviors, and habitat.


First Draft
:

Let your story flow and start writing your story according to your prewriting. Like all good paragraphs, please be sure you include the following:

§  Topic Sentence: State your main idea, what you are writing about, but don't name your animal in your actual paragraph.

§  Supporting Details: Include descriptive details about your animal that will help us guess your animal.

§  Descriptive Language: Use sensory words to describe your animal.

  • How does your animal look, sound, or feel?
  • How does your animal move and what can it do?
  • Describe where your animal lives and the special adaptations that help it survive there.

Revise and Edit:

Be sure you have included as many descriptive details that you can. You want to provide your class with enough clues to be able to make an educated guess about which animal we think you are writing about. Also, make sure you correct any spelling, capitalization, and punctuation.


Final Draft
:

Neatly write your final copy. Don't forget to use your paper correctly and indent the first line of each paragraph. Remember to space your letters evenly in words and your words evenly in sentences.

3. Have fun drawing or building your creature!

4. Be ready to share on Thursday 5/7 during our ZOOM meeting.

Remember, this is meant to be an extra and fun project. Do not stress about it, and if your family can’t make it work, that is okay. I look forward to hearing and guessing with those that have time for the project this Thursday 5/7!



Week 6 Lesson Plans

April 27 - May 1, 2020


This Week's Lesson Plans

Download Week 6 - April 27, 2020

If you haven't yet tried Flocabulary, please be sure to do so this week. Lessons are active and waiting for you there. Simply go to Flocabulary.com to begin. If you need help logging in, you can download the How-To Flocabulary Here

Wednesday, April 29 - Thursday, May 7 Science Activity

Land Biomes of the World Unit

Tuesday, April 28 Zoom Notes



Zoom Notes 4-28-20

Zoom Notes 4-28-20

Zoom Notes 4-28-20

Zoom Notes 4-28-20

Zoom Notes 4-28-20

Zoom Notes 4-28-20

Zoom Notes 4-28-20

Zoom Notes 4-28-20

Zoom Notes 4-28-20

Zoom Notes 4-28-20

Zoom Notes 4-28-20




Week 5 - Lesson Plans

April 20-24, 2020


This Week's Lesson Plans

Download Week05 - April 20th Lesson Plan

This Week's Temperature Activity

Download Temperature Activity

Tuesday, 4/21 Zoom Class Notes

Zoom 4-21-20 Practice

Zoom 4-21-20 Notes01

Zoom 4-21-20 Notes02

Friday, 4/24/20

Flocabulary Science Lesson I am super excited to introduce Flocabulary to you today! It is a fun and engaging way to learn new vocabulary and content through the use of music, beats, and hip-hop. Get ready to move to the music and learn, learn, and learn some more. Your account login has already been setup for you. It is similar to your Clever login, but a little different. So, be sure to look over the how to directions below before trying to login. Today, you will begin your very first lesson on Food Chains. Spend a little time today logging in for the first time, learning your way around the new website, and working some on the Food Chain assignment. It will be due next Wednesday the 29th. Have fun!

Flocabulary How-To

Download Flocabulary How-To

Flocabulary Link

Click Here for Flocabulary


Week 4 - Lesson Plans

April 13-17, 2020


If you need to download this week's lesson plan, it is available below:
Download Week04 - April 13th Lesson Plan

If you need or want a copy or graph paper, it is available below:
Download Graph Paper

Wednesday, 4/15/20 Science Activity

As we have learned, the animal world has many amazing adaptations. Mimicry is our new and special adaptation for today! Mimicry is when an animal looks or acts like another animal. Take a look at the worksheet below. You can download and print it, or simply copy the questions onto a blank piece of paper. As you watch the video, pause it when necessary to complete the worksheet.

Download worksheet here

Watch video here

Additional Mimicry Examples:
Mimicry is such a cool adaptation. Here is an additional link for mimicry to enjoy and learn even more. You do not need to take notes or complete a worksheet for this one. Simply enjoy it!

Mimicry by Kids Britannica

Friday, 4/17/20 Science Activity

Creature Writing Project
Completion Date: Thursday, 4/23
Download a copy here.

This is meant to be a fun project that combines our science study and writing! It is suggested that you spend about 15-20 minutes each today, beginning today through next Wednesday.

Project Overview
:
You will write a narrative, or story, where the main character is an animal of your choice. The supporting characters can be other animals or humans. Be sure you know some scientific information about the animal or animals you choose so you can select an appropriate setting for your story. Also, focus on your "creature's features" so you can add descriptive, and scientific, details to bring your story to life. When you are done writing, draw a picture of your animal character. If you prefer, you may build your animal out of Lego or odds and ends you find around your house. We will share our stories and creature characters in our Zoom Class Meeting on Thursday 4/23.

Process
:

1. 
Watch the Creature Feature read-aloud.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_teFvYD3aIc

2. Watch 8 Unique Creatures video.
https://www.youtubekids.com/watch?v=eDEM4iIhFi4

3. Watch 8 Rare Creatures video.
https://www.youtubekids.com/watch?v=vl-PcTA9HHg

4. Write your Story.

  • Main Character: Decide on main character and its characteristics in the story.
  • Prewriting: Brainstorm and organize your story ideas for your character with a bubble map or chart.
  • First Draft: Let your story flow and start writing your story according to your prewriting.
    • Characters: Include your character's traits (creature features) and emotions.
    • Setting: Be sure the setting works with the natural habitat of your animal character.
    • A Conflict and Resolution: What conflict or problem does your character encounter? What resolution solves this conflict for your character?
    • Sequence of Events: Make sure your story flows from beginning to middle to end.
    • 5 W's + H: Plan your story with Who, Where, When, What, Why, and How. 
  • Revise and Edit: Be sure to add descriptive details and make sure your story flows in a logical sequence or order. Also, make sure you correct any spelling, capitalization, and punctuation.
  • Final Draft: Neatly write your final copy. Don't forget to use your paper correctly and indent the first line of each paragraph. Remember to space your letters evenly in words and your words evenly in sentences.

5. Have fun drawing or building your creature!

6. Be ready to share on Thursday 4/23 during our ZOOM meeting.

Remember, this is meant to be an extra and fun project. Do not stress about it, and if your family can’t make it work, that is okay. I look forward to seeing those that have time for the project next Thursday 4/23!




Friday, 4/3/20

Neighborhood Animals

Today, take a field trip to your yard. Bring along a pencil, piece of paper, and something to write on. Look for any animals you see near your home. As you see an animal write it down on your paper and watch it for a while. Then...
  1. Make a T-chart listing the physical and behavioral adaptations that you notice. 
  2. Think about the behavioral adaptations you wrote down. Do you think the animal learned this behavior or is it instinct?
  3. How does each adaptation help the animal survive where it lives?
See how many different animals and adaptations you can find.



Thursday, 4/2/20

Defense Adaptations

Many animals have unique defense adaptations to keep them safe from the many predators around them. Watch this video, and answer the questions below about the animals in the video. You may want to pause the video as you go to write down your answers. If you want, you can print the worksheet with questions here.

1. Why does the blue-tongued skink have a blue tongue?
2. What can skinks and many other lizards do with their tails and why?
3. What adaptation do green-cheeked parakeets normally have in the wild to keep them hidden from predators?
4. What does the word "camouflage" mean in the English language?
5. What special defense adaptation does the emperor scorpion have since it does not have strong venom in its tail?
6. How are the quills of an African crested porcupine able to make noise?
 


Wednesday, 4/1/20

20-Page Research Paper to Write...April Fools

Just kidding about the 20-page paper, but happy April Fools' Day! Instead, you get to learn about a very unique and rare animal life cycle close to home.

Do you remember our Story of Migration in reading a few weeks back? Remember the large grasshopper migration in the story? This will remind you a lot of that. Although it isn't a migration, the over-abundance of a creature will occur this year (2020) in our very own backyards. It's the year for periodic cicadas in the Eastern part of the United States. A cicada is a large winged insect. You may have seen their outer shells on trees in the past or heard them on a early summer evening. Follow the steps below to find out more!

1. Watch the Cicada Video.
2. Check out the map for the location of different Cicada broods or groups Eastern part of America. We live in the orange area.
3. Check out these photos of cicadas.
4. Read more here about them. Also, be sure to check out the fun video on this page too that highlights the cool and unique sound of cicadas. 


Tuesday, 3/31/20

Adaptation Study Jams!

Using the links below, complete the two activities on Animal Adaptations and Plant Adaptations.

Step 1: Watch the Animal Adaptations Video Here.
Step 2: Write down the four key vocabulary definitions on paper from the Study Jam page (adaptation, camouflage, natural selection, and instinct).
Step 3: "Test Yourself" on the Study Jam page. Try to get at least 5 correct.
Step 4: Review your answers for any that you missed.
Step 5: Watch the Plant Adaptations Video Here.
Step 6: Write down the two new key vocabulary definitions on your paper from the Study Jam page (environment and adapt).
Step 7: "Test Yourself" on the Study Jam page. Try to get at least 5 correct again.
Step 8: Review your answers for any that you missed.


 

Monday, 3/30/20

No New Activity Online Today

No new activity is posted online today to give your family time to pickup your new packets from school and plan how your family will use them between now and Spring Break. Also, if you didn't complete any of the activities below from the previous two weeks, you can do some of those today.


 

Friday, 3/27/20

Activity #7
Notes on Instinct and Learned Behaviors

In today's activity, you will create a Venn-Diagram for Instinct and Learned Behaviors. Simply drawn your own Venn-Diagram on paper or download and print the Venn-Diagram I have supplied. Then watch the video below, and add the notes from the video to your Venn-Diagram. If you need more or less time than the video provides, you can pause it, rewind it, or skip ahead as needed. Enjoy!



Thursday, 3/26/20

Activity #6
Instinct and Learned Behaviors

Animals behave in many unique and different ways. Some of these behaviors have to be taught to them. For example, a bear cub spends a few years with its mother learning how to hunt for its food. This is an example of a learned behavior. You learn many things in your life. You learned to talk, read, and walk. Many animals learn many behaviors too. Sometimes, there are certain behaviors that an animal is born able to do. Baby sea turtles can swim immediately after they are born. In fact, their mother is no where around. This type of behavior is known as an instinct ​or innate behavior. You could cry from birth. No one had to teach you to cry. This is an instinct or innate behavior. 

Today's activity is to watch the video below comparing the differences between learned and innate or instinctual behaviors. The video is older, but has some great examples. After watching, or during the video make a T-chart with "Learned Behaviors" on one side and "Instinct Behaviors" on the other. Keep track of the animals and their behavior using the chart you create.

Animal Behavior Video


    Wednesday, 3/25/20

    Activity #5
    San Diego Zoo Field Trip

    Today we are going to the San Diego Zoo. This is one of the best zoo's in America. I actually had the opportunity to visit it about 3 years ago. It was awesome!

    1. Read Cold-weather critters to learn how other animals have adapted to living in harsh, cold climates. Be sure to scroll down the page and read about all of the animals.

    2. On a piece of paper, make a chart for each of the animals you read about and their specific physical (body) adaptations that help them survive in the cold. Do you notice any physical adaptations that these animals have in common? Do you notice any adaptations that are unique to each animal? In your comparison of cold-weather critters, include the polar bear that you learned about yesterday. See if you can find a behavioral (behavior / act) adaptation about one of the animals you read about.

    3. Watch the Arctic Ducks video at the top of the Cold-Weather Critters page.

    4. Add the Arctic Ducks and their adaptations to your chart.

    5. Now, just for fun visit this Polar Bear link to learn even more about polar bears. Plus there is another cool video about them and a webcam to watch live on the page.

    6. Continue browsing the San Diego Zoo website as much as you like. It has many cool things to see and learn about animals!


    Tuesday, 3/24/20

    Activity #5
    Field Trip to the Tundra

    Let's take a field trip today to the Tundra today! This is an awesome virtual Field Trip opportunity to learn about a unique animal with many unique adaptations. As you watch, write down key science ideas that relate to the many adaptations of the Polar Bear in its extreme arctic environment. The middle portion really focuses on these many amazing adaptations of the polar bear. Pay special attention to the last half of the video as it gets into the detailed impact that we as humans have on polar bears and their environment. You will hear a lot of discussion that relates to our earlier studied resources unit. Enjoy!

    Video: Experience Polar Bears on the Tundra


    Monday, 3/23/20

    Activity #4
    Writing Activity

    Since we have now spent an entire week doing distance learning from home, let's write about our experiences! Your writing must have at least 5 total sentences: one topic, three details, and a conclusion. However, you can always write more...Include lots and lots of details! Choose one of the following topics or approaches for your writing:

    1. Compare and contrast - Write about the ways your home learning experiences last week were the same and ways that they were different from learning at school. 
    2. Narrative Story - In a story format, tell us what your experiences were like over the past week. Here you are looking to add as many details about your new learning experience as possible.
    3. Persuasion - Try to convince your reader that learning from home is better than learning from school. Or try to convince your reader that learning from school is better than learning from home. Remember, you must have three good reasons for what you believe. 

    Lastly, if mom or dad is able, have them snap a photo of your writing and email it to me. If you are up to it, you could also type your writing on the computer instead of taking a photo. I would love to read these!


     

    Friday, 3/20/20

    Activity #3
    New Science IXL!

    We now have access to Science learning options in IXL too! This is a new function that has been added since school closures. So, take this opportunity to explore the Science section of IXL today. To tie into our adaptations unit, please be sure to complete the follow four activities:

    N.1 Intro to Adaptations
    N.2 Adaptations: Beaks, Mouths, and Necks
    N.3 Adaptations: Feet and Limbs
    N.4 Adaptations: Skins and Body Coverings


    Thursday, 3/19/20

    Activity #2
    Creaturepedia Webquest

    Animals are amazing, and this Wild Kratt's Webquest will help to demonstrate just that! Spend some time exploring many of the different animals throughout the world in their unique environments. Do some research on four animals of your choice. Answer these questions about each animal:

    1. What is its name?
    2. Where does it live?
    3. What does it eat?
    4. What eats it?
    5. What special adaptations does it have?
    6. What are some other interesting facts?

    I recommend going through the Habitat Link on the website and researching two animals that are terrestrial (land), one that is aquatic (water), and one that is aerial (air). You can write your answers to the questions above on your own sheet of paper, or download and print a WORKSHEET HERE.

    WILD KRATT'S CREATUREPEDIA WEBSITE


    Wednesday, 3/18/20

    Activity #1
    Animal Adaptations - 20 Minute Field Trip

    Before we left last Friday, we were studying animal adaptations. Adaptations are ways animals survive in their different environments. The Cincinnati Zoo is providing some awesome virtual experiences with their animals that can help you learn more about adaptations from home. As you watch the video, you can create a T-Chart of Physical and Behavioral Adaptations about these Hippos' characteristics. Remember a Physical Adaptation is like a "tool" that the animal has (noun), and a Behavioral Adaptation is an "action" that the animal does (verb). See how many you can find. You can make your own T-chart on blank paper, or DOWNLOAD the T-CHART HERE and print. Enjoy the activity!

    CINCINNATI ZOO HIPPO VIDEO